Native American News

Welcome to Native American News, by Native American Encyclopedia. Our objective is to; Honor our Elders, Inspire our Youth, Document our History & Share our Culture.

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    Raynond Stevens ~ Haida/Nisga’a

    Raymond’s birth mother was Nisga’a and his birth father was Haida, but he was adopted by Haida artist Bill Reid and Bill’s wife at the time, Mabel Stevens. Raymond first worked with argillite after being enrolled in a children’s carving class run by Haida artist Rufus Moody, which was held in Skidegate in the early 1960s. Raymond’s talent was identified immediately and he became famous on Haida Gwaii for his incredibly fine crosshatching.

    Damen Bell-Holter (Haida) to play professional basketball overseas for BC Kormend

    From a small Alaskan village of less than 300 people, Damen Bell-Holder (Haida) is living out his Dreams he has worked so hard for and now will be playing for one of the top teams in Europe during the off-season.
    Last season, Bell-Holter spent his NBA pre-season with the Boston Celtics and made it all the way until the final cut day.

    Leonard Tsosie “Corn Hill” – Jemez

    Leonard Tsosie “Corn Hill” was born in the late 1940’s into the Jemez Pueblo. Leonard was inspired to continue a long lived tradition by observing his wife, Emily Fragua-Tsosie. She is known for hand coiling storytellers and corn maidens. Leonard has been working with clay since the age of 11. However, he didn’t spark an interest in working with clay until he noticed how dedicated his wife was to her art.

    Native American Legend of Fish-Hawk and Scapegrace http://bit.ly/10wRSVi 


    The Promise Of Tomorrow By Jamie Sams “Earth Medicine”  http://bit.ly/15mLS8Q 


    The hairstyles and headwear of the Native American tribes and the indigenous peoples of the Subarctic and Arctic are many and varied. http://bit.ly/1oZuSyp

    Brent Sparrow ~ Musqueam

    Brent has spent years apprenticing with his mother, Susan A. Point and with John Livingston since 2006. He studied welding at BCIT, receiving a provincial “B” Red Seal, as well as completing the first year of Steel Fabrication. Brent has gained experience working with his mother on the creation and installation of several public art projects including pieces for the City of Vancouver, the City of Richmond, the Stanley Park Gateways, the Vancouver Convention Centre, the YVR Skytrain Station as well as the Seattle Children’s Hospital.

    Calumet pipes are ceremonial tobacco pipes which were important in many Native American tribes. Learn How to Drill Calumet Pipe Stems http://bit.ly/1tcWmzL

    Keep the traditions going…

    The Hand Game

    This game is played among eighty-one Indian tribes of the United States. The game bears different names in the various languages of these tribes. Hand Game is a descriptive term and not a translation of any native name; it refers to the fact that the object is held in the hand during the play. The following form of this game is the way it was formerly played among the Nez Perce Indians of the State of Idaho.


    The Native American #RainDance was the most common among the Native American tribes in the southwest of America. http://bit.ly/19OL0fX

    Beads have always been popular among the Indians and the Seminoles were no exception. http://bit.ly/RtSINp

    Children’s Native American Names

    Among the Omaha a ceremony was observed shortly after the birth of a child that on broad lines reflects a general belief among the Native Americans.
    In the introductory chapter of this book the Native American’s feeling of unquestioning unity with nature is mentioned. The following Omaha ceremony and ritual furnish direct testimony to the profundity of this feeling. Its expression greets him at his birth and is iterated at every important experience throughout his life.

    Native American jewelry is being made in traditional forms and contemporary forms today. http://bit.ly/GNpDtg

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